2014 Professional Development Sessions



 
 
 

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Professional Development Sessions #1
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Charitable Purpose Trusts: Evolution, not Revolution
The X Factor: The Future of Women in Philanthropy
Making 1 Equal 10: The Math of Multi-Purposing Content
Leadership Giving – Supporting Your Annual Fund and Your Major-Gift Pipeline
The Alumni Impact Survey – Providing Direction for the Future of Alumni Relations Engagement

Professional Development Sessions #2
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

From Chaos to Calm – A Case Study in Electronic Records Management
Are You In? One School's Journey into the World of LinkedIn
What is the Future of Corporate and Foundation Giving?
Thrive: Transforming Development at a Small University
5 + 5 (How the Past 5 Years and the Next 5 Years Shape Our Relationship with Young Alumni)

The Leadership Perspective
2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Thursday, June 5, 2014
Professional Development Sessions #3
9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Beyond Prospects: How Data Mining can Uncover Insights and Guide Program Decisions
Planned Giving - Back to the Future
Preparing Professionals: Mentorship Programs For Community Colleges
Looking Beyond the Gift: Customized Stewardship to Strategic Engagement
Staying Global: How International Alumni Relations Advances the Agenda
Roundtables
10:30 a.m. – 12 noon
So You Ask People for Money, Right? From Fundraiser to Friend-raiser to Community Developer
Managing Advancement and PR Teams in a Time of Fiscal Restraint
Big Science Fundraising
International Alumni Relations: Trends for the Next Decade
Community College Affinity programs
Winning over talented Millennials and curating dedicated new alumni
Donor Acknowledgement
The Digital Information Asset: The Future of Information for Alumni Relations
Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL): What Every Advancement Professional Needs to Ask
Big Ideas Panel Discussions
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Gifted and Talented: What Makes a Top Fundraiser in the Age of Venture Philanthropy?
Globalization and Canadian Education
Go Fund Yourself!
Digital Alumni Engagement
Friday, June 6, 2014

Professional Development Sessions #4
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Morning at the Improv: The Art of Asking
Too Many Cooks, Not Enough Chefs! Business Process Improvement
New Age of Phonathons: How to Treat Alumni Like Major Donors through Phone Calls
50 Events in 50 Days: A Summer Send-Off Program
The Outsiders No Longer: Embracing Non-Traditional Candidates to Grow Your Development Team



Professional Development Session #1

 

Charitable Purpose Trusts: Evolution, not Revolution

Greg Harding, QC, Partner, Field Law
Matt Weaver, CGA, B. Mgt., Recording Secretary, University of Alberta

 

This presentation will examine the foundations of "modern" special charitable purpose trusts and canvass recent judicial consideration of their key elements, including in the areas of: acceptable purposes; human rights (discrimination) law; spending and investment provisions; variation of terms; trustee liability; and access to trust property by trustee creditors.

 

 

The X Factor: The Future of Women in Philanthropy

Honora Shaughnessy, Senior Executive Director of Alumni Relations, McGill University
Wendy Schilling, Senior Regional Programs Officer, McGill University

 

Advertising companies know that women are from Venus, not Mars, and they target this group very differently in marketing campaigns. As Canadian female university graduates outnumber their male counterparts, what, if anything, are we doing to make sure this gender shift is being translated into our own strategic planning?

 

This session will:

  • Demonstrate why women-focused engagement strategies are vital to the future of strong women’s leadership in philanthropy.
  • Present the Women in Leadership and Philanthropy project launched at McGill, with findings from focus groups, surveys, and interviews.
  • Arm you with the data and knowledge needed to build a case for women-focused engagement strategies at your institution.
  • Discuss tools used to engage women in meaningful ways and demonstrate the power of women’s networks.

 

 

Making 1 Equal 10: The Math of Multi-Purposing Content

Gord Arbeau, Director, Public and Community Relations, McMaster University
Matt Terry, Manager, Strategic Communications, McMaster University

Find an inspiring story, post a release to your online newsroom, pitch some reporters, and watch the hits roll in. Job well done - right?

 

If you’re not using the many communications tools available to modern PR pros, you’re missing out. Your audience members don’t just read newspapers – they’re on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. They love photos and video. And they still listen to radio and watch TV.

 

We’ll teach you the formula for taking one story and turning it into many pieces of content – from a media release and a video to a tweet and a feature story in your alumni magazine (and everything in between).

 

In this session you’ll learn:

  • How to take one story and turn it into many pieces of content.
  • How to create engaging content for social media channels.
  • How to develop multiple story angles from one story.
  • How to turn almost everything into content.
  • How to get the most content out of a short campaign.

 

 

Leadership Giving – Supporting Your Annual Fund and Your Major-Gift Pipeline

Sheri Cole, Leadership Giving Development Officer, University of Toronto
Heather Ullman, Director, Leadership Annual Giving, University of Toronto

 

As more schools look to expand their annual fundraising and major-gift prospect pools, they increasingly look to Leadership Annual Giving (or their mid-level donors) to help them do so. We will explore how two schools define Leadership Giving, what metrics they use to demonstrate success, how to identify leadership prospects in your data, and ways to conduct effective meetings and solicitations specifically for Leadership Annual Giving.

 

This session will deliver:

  • Points on where to start your Leadership Annual Giving program.
  • Metrics for measuring successful Leadership Annual Giving Programs.
  • Identifying hidden gems for your Leadership Annual Giving prospect pool.
  • Tips for successful Leadership Annual Giving asks (from personal visits to mass solicitations).

 

 

 

The Alumni Impact Survey – Providing Direction for the Future of Alumni Relations Engagement

Sean Price, Associate Vice-President, Alumni Relations, University of Alberta
Christie Myhre, Coordinator, Campus Chapters, University of Alberta
Ashlyn Bernier, Manager, Venture Mentoring Service, University of Alberta

 

In 2012-13, the University of Alberta surveyed its alumni to learn of their economic, social, and cultural impact on society. The findings were staggering. University of Alberta alumni worldwide create a $350 billion annual economic impact. The survey has provided a vital roadmap for future alumni relations strategies.

This session will provide:

  • A description of the University of Alberta Impact Survey, applicable at other schools.
  • New programs created as a result of survey findings, including:
    • Venture Mentoring Service
    • Do Great Things Volunteer Challenge
    • Faculty and research initiatives

 

 

Professional Development Session #2

 

From Chaos to Calm – A Case Study in Electronic Records Management

Margaret Tannahill-Wade, Prospect Management Officer, Carleton University

 

The boss wants to see a donor’s endowment report, but it’s not in the cabinet where it should be. Three support staff fan out among the offices. Two hours later, a 5-inch thick pile of paper is found that chronicles the donor’s years-long relationship with your institution, and no endowment report is inside! It might or might not be the only folder that exists for that donor. Now what?? Chaos can turn to calm through well-planned electronic records management architecture. This session will discuss the opportunities and threats, process and costs involved in ERM, and the rationale used by Carleton’s Advancement Department for choosing Sharepoint. Carleton’s Department of University Advancement has increased efficiency, access, security, confidentiality, and space by migrating more than 32,000 paper files to electronic format – and has learned many lessons about changing from a paper-bound office culture.

 

 

What Is the Future of Corporate and Foundation Giving?

Jane Potentier, Director of Advancement, Faculty of Arts, University of Alberta

 

As Advancement organizations across North America sharpen their focus on individual giving, it is important to remember that educational institutions have a long history of engaging corporations and foundations in development efforts. And the Corporate and Foundations Relations (CFR) landscape continues to evolve. This session will take a look at the potential of CFR and consider new models that will help you strategically build corporate and foundation support, and ensure that CFR remains a strong, effective component of your development program.

 

This session will:

  • Enhance your understanding of Corporate and Foundation Relations and the pivotal role we play in Advancement.
  • Discuss innovative ways to engage corporations and foundations in collaborative partnerships.
  • Demonstrate new ways of partnering with colleagues in advancement, and with others across the campus, in building institutional relationships with corporations and foundations.
  • Share stories on how to leverage individual fundraisers’ work through CFR.

 

 

Are You In? One School's Journey into the World of LinkedIn

Melissa Cheater, Digital Content Manager, Western University
Perry Monaco, LinkedIn Strategic Product Consultant
Trista Walker, Executive Director, Alumni Relations, Western University

 

In this session, you will:

  • Discover University Pages and LinkedIn’s Alumni Tool.
  • Learn how Western University made a commitment to become a leader in LinkedIn strategy.
  • Gain an overview of Western’s event series, alumni engagement goals, and campus- based approach.
  • Learn how the tool can be useful to career services at your school.

 

 

Thrive: Transforming Development at a Small University

Dan VanKeeken, Vice-President, Advancement, The King's University College
Mike Ferber, Director of Development, The King's University College

 

By sharing the transformation of philanthropic culture at The King’s University College in Edmonton, the presenters will outline how annual donations to the operating fund have nearly doubled, and capital donations have begun to transform the university. We’ll talk about how to capitalize on the mission and vision of an organization, implement creative approaches, and apply donor-centric strategies while remaining true to mission and values. We’ll discuss integrating the full spectrum of giving, including legacy gifts, while laying the groundwork for a large capital campaign.

 

This session will provide:

  • A case history of the successful transformation of development at a 700-student, independent university in Edmonton.
  • A look at how a new vision can cover the waterfront: From concept to donor-centric fundraising.
  • Time to compare notes and learn from others’ success stories.

 

 

5 + 5 (How the Past 5 Years and the Next 5 Years Shape Our Relationship with Young Alumni)

Erin O’Neil, Alumni Officer, Young Alumni, McMaster University

 

Five years ago, iPhones had just been introduced to the market and the iPad was years from release. Google Chrome didn’t yet exist. Twitter had less than one-tenth of the users it has today. Kickstarter and Indiegogo were small start-ups. Few people had heard of Dan Pallotta. Or charity: water.

 

The world has changed dramatically in the last half decade, and progress will continue to alter the way we communicate and engage. Young alumni are challenging us to explore new opportunities and ideas made possible by technology, from crowdfunding to interactive digital strategies to online program delivery. Our challenge in working with young alumni during this time of intense change is to examine these opportunities carefully while remaining focused on relationships.

 

How will young-alumni relations look in 5+ years? No matter how much technology – and our use of it – changes, we must be consistent with the relationships that we nurture, from students through to alumni and donors.

 

 

 

 

The Leadership Perspective

Ms. Karen Jurjevich, Principal, Branksome Hall
Dr. Roseann O'Reilly Runte, President, Carleton University
Dr. David Ross, President, SAIT Polytechnic
Moderator Dr. Debra Pozega Osburn, Vice-President, University Relations, University of Alberta

 

Canadian education leaders of today will play a definitive role in shaping the landscape of tomorrow. What do they see over the horizon for independent schools and post-secondary institutions? What will be their priorities for the role of advancement? In an era of fiscal and regulatory challenges and increasing globalization, how do our schools remain buoyant, effective, and relevant? Join us for a candid assessment from school leaders' perspectives.

 

 

 

Professional Development Session #3

Beyond Prospects: How Data Mining can Uncover Insights and Guide Program Decisions

Celeste Bannon Waterman, Vice President, Research & Analytics, KCI
Christopher Seguin, Vice President, Advancement, Thompson Rivers University

 

Using analytics to identify potential major-gift prospects is a current “hot topic”, as organizations continually try to uncover new potential donors to build their pipelines. But a data-driven approach to researching the characteristics of your donors – and top donors – can uncover insights and trends that go far beyond prospect identification.

 

This informative and accessible conversation will demonstrate how mining your database for top prospects can provide insights that guide program decisions and inspire group cultivation strategies, using the experience of Thompson Rivers University’s recent analytics project as an integral element in the campaign planning process. Through this example, as well as others from KCI’s experience, Christopher and Celeste will discuss how analytics can uncover trends and patterns in alumni and donor data; influence programs and reactivation strategies; and sometimes change the way major-gift professionals think about their constituents. Learn strategies you can use for mining your data, and uncovering surprises of your own.

 

Through this session you will:

  • Learn how to uncover trends and patterns that go beyond identifying donor prospects.
  • Gain insights that will guide programming decisions, such as membership drives and reactivations strategies.

 

 

Planned Giving - Back to the Future

Sheila Steger, MA, CFRE, Senior Director, Individual Giving, University of Alberta
Michele Shea, Director of Planned Giving, University of Alberta

 

This session will provide a roadmap for success in moving your planned giving program forward. Using best practice, we will discuss strategies and plans you can implement today across your institution that are sure to pay off in the next five years of your program and beyond.

 

 

 

Preparing Professionals: Mentorship Programs For Community Colleges

Catherine Finlayson, Executive Director, Fanshawe College Foundation
Tim Ambrose, Alumni Outreach Coordinator, Fanshawe College

 

Preparing students for their transition from student to professional has never been more important. A comprehensive mentorship program can support this transition by helping students develop connections that will benefit them in the classroom, on campus, and in the work world. This session will highlight The Larry Myny Mentorship Program at Fanshawe College as a model that supports long-term student success.

 

Attendees will learn how to:

  • Launch and operate a results-oriented mentorship program in a community college.
  • Strategically recruit students and mentors for their program.
  • Make key contacts to support programs - including internal departments, external contacts, and prospective program sponsors.

 

 

Looking Beyond the Gift: Customized Stewardship to Strategic Engagement

Ashleigh Manktelow, Associate Director, Donor Relations, McGill University

 

Do the designations of your donors’ gifts tell you everything about the interests of your donors?   Can we determine what will be engaging to a specific donor because he or she supports student awards?  Founded on the basics, a customized approach to stewardship looks at donors in a holistic way, seeking to understand their connections with the organization and its mission, their interests beyond a single gift, and the initiatives that will further engage them. This session will explore the many ways in which we can creatively and strategically steward our donors by involving them beyond the life of their gifts.

 

 

Staying Global: How International Alumni Relations Advances the Agenda

Gretchen Dobson, Ed.D, Global Strategist, Gretchen Dobson LLC

Higher and independent education leaders understand that engaging alumni outside their borders is an imperative in a global society, but existing resources, books, and articles haven’t deeply examined the models different institutions use to recruit and manage alumni to support specific initiatives, nor how they are measuring results. It’s one thing to “be global;” it’s another to “stay global.” Staying global requires sustaining the interest and efforts of international alumni in helping achieve top agenda items for the institution. This presentation introduces university case studies whose examples are worth noting. A 15-minute Q&A period will conclude the session.

 

 

 

Roundtables

So You Ask People for Money, Right? From Fundraiser to Friend-raiser to Community Developer

Josh Noble, Alumni Relations Manager, The King’s University College

 

A ubiquitous issue in Alumni departments is cynicism from constituents who feel the sole purpose of Alumni Relations is fundraising. In this roundtable, we will discuss:

  • basic institutional models for alumni relations;
  • how to communicate your purpose effectively; and
  • conceptualizing the value of engagement to your alumni and your institution. 

 

 

Managing Advancement and PR Teams in a Time of Fiscal Restraint

Dan Hurley, Executive Director, University Relations, Vancouver Island University

 

How are advancement and PR leaders inspiring their teams to go above and beyond in an era of government cutbacks and fiscal restraint? In this interactive session, learn from fellow practitioners about making the best use of limited resources, while hiring and keeping the best talent.

 

In this roundtable we will discuss examples of:

  • How to keep staff motivated and engaged in spite of cutbacks.
  • How advancement/PR leaders are delivering with limited resources and people.
  • How different units can collaborate to deliver effective campaigns and programs.

 

 

International Alumni Relations: Trends for the Next Decade

Gretchen Dobson, Ed.D, Global Strategist, Gretchen Dobson LLC

Internationalization efforts on campus are increasingly becoming strategic priorities. International student recruitment, international branch campuses, dual-degree programs with universities outside Canada, student mobility programs and the growth in on-line learning creates opportunities to engage graduates abroad and to reinforce the value of a global alumni relations program. Come share your thoughts in this facilitated Roundtable discussion.

 

 

Big Science Fundraising

O'Neil Outar, Vice-President, Advancement, University of Alberta

 

This roundtable will discuss Big Science initiatives in Canadian post-secondary education, and the role of the Advancement shop in shaping, supporting, and enabling these projects.

 

Big Science often refers to multidisciplinary, multi-school/faculty, and increasingly, multi-institution problem solving focused on complex global issues, such as programs focused on the environment, cancer research, virology, and poverty alleviation. These initiatives have the potential to differentiate an institution and to attract additional funding from smaller donors.

 

They also have the potential to wreak havoc if faculty are unable to develop and implement an academic program to attract philanthropic support; if the donor’s interests do not align with the institution; and if leadership of the initiative is not in place.

 

We will also discuss expectations by the public, donors, government, and students that Big Science projects will create economic benefits for the University, the inventors, and society.

 

 

Community College Affinity programs

Tom Meadus, Director of Advancement, NB Community College

 

This is an opportunity for community colleges to come together for a discussion on current events and issues of relevance to community college advancement. It will also ensure that conference participants from the various community colleges have the opportunity to connect. Topics will include the business case for support - presenting donations to community colleges as investment opportunities; Student Engagement – ideas and strategies for attracting students to the alumni association while in school; and Alumni strategies and success stories.

 

 

Winning over talented Millennials and curating dedicated new alumni

Emerson Csorba, Director, Gen Y Inc.; 3M National Fellow

 

In this roundtable, 3M National Fellow and American Express "Emerging Innovator" Emerson Csorba, Director of Gen Y Inc., shares best practices on how advancement leaders can tap into the hearts and minds of university student leaders and young professionals. Based on research conducted across Canada and business experiences with his advisory and recruitment company Gen Y Inc., labelled by the Globe and Mail as one of Canada's promising "disruptor" firms, Emerson shares expertise on what makes Millennials tick. Insights from this session will help advancement leaders build fiercely dedicated new alumni, who bring with them both energy and vast social networks.

 

 

Donor Acknowledgement

Ashleigh Manktelow, Associate Director, Donor Relations, McGill University

 

Highly customized acknowledgements are a personal way to express thanks and ensure donors know their gifts are appreciated. However, limited resources often necessitate the use of mass-produced template letters that do little to speak to our donors in a meaningful way. This roundtable will explore strategies in donor segmentation and acknowledgment vehicles that can break through the clutter and truly reach our donors.

 

 

The Digital Information Asset: The Future of Information for Alumni Relations

Japman Bajaj, Executive Director, Western Canada, Soshal

 

It's not 1990 anymore. Indeed, just 25 years ago, the relationship between an institution and its alumni was concrete, discrete, and predictable. Today, it is an ever-evolving relationship, as the nature of education delivery changes, as the presence of technology becomes more pervasive, and as the globalized world increases the mobility of our alumni.

 

With so many people earning diplomas and degrees, interacting with Student Information Systems, and earning experiences domestically and globally, is there not a better way to maximize the relationship with our students once they've left our doors? Have we changed since 1990 at the same pace that the world has?
In this roundtable discussion, we will open the door for participants to think critically about the role of information for Alumni Relations and Advancement professionals. We will discuss interesting trends in areas such as annual fund development, crowdfunding, event-based revenue streams, mobile technologies, and affinity partnerships. This roundtable is ideal for advancement professionals who have ever thought "there has to be a better way..."

 

 

Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL): What Every Advancement Professional Needs to Ask

Mark Hazlett, Executive Director, CCAE

 

On July 1, 2014, Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL) will begin to take effect. Every advancement professional in Canada needs to study the intent and primary requirements of CASL, and how these may (or may not) affect advancement programs and activities.

 

Based on extensive study of this legislation by the CCAE Executive Director and Board of Directors - and a CCAE Board discussion with the Policy Advisor, National Anti-Spam Coordinating Body, Digital Policy Branch, Industry Canada - this roundtable will examine key questions related to CASL, including:

  • What are the primary purposes of CASL, and how will the legislation affect Canadian advancement?
  • What status do educational institutions hold under CASL?
  • What is a commercial electronic message (CEM), and what are the terms of consent under CASL for sending CEMs?
  • How does CASL affect affinity programs and CEMs related to affinity partner offerings?
  • How can we differentiate between express consent and implied consent to send CEMs, to comply with CASL?

After an initial presentation on CCAE’s understanding of CASL as it relates to Canadian advancement, ample time will be provided for discussion, questions, and answers.
Consult your school’s senior administration and legal counsel, and share your school’s findings on this important topic.

 

 

Big Ideas Panel Discussions

1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

 

 

Gifted and Talented: What Makes a Top Fundraiser in the Age of Venture Philanthropy?

Panelists:

  • Andrea Morris, Senior Director, Office of Advancement, University of Alberta
  • Gillian Morrison, Campaign Director, University of Toronto (moderator)
  • Nicholas Offord, The Offord Group
  • Lorna Somers, Director of Development and Vice-President, McMaster University Foundation, McMaster University

As universities grapple with the challenges of attracting and retaining high-performing, front-line fundraisers, it is more important than ever to focus on innovative approaches to human capital strategy in advancement offices. This session will explore the attitudes, behaviours and competencies associated with top performance among major-gift officers.

 

 

Globalization and Canadian Education

Panelists:

  • Carl Amrhein, Provost, University of Alberta; Fellow, Conference Board of Canada
  • Amir Pasic, Vice-President, International Operations, Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)
  • Karen Jurjevich, Principal, Branksome Hall

Education in Canada, as elsewhere, faces many challenges. In fact, this may be the most challenging period for elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educational institutions since the turmoil of the ‘60s.

 

Student demographics are changing; global competition is increasing; domestically, unstable PSE funding from government sources has given rise to alternative funding models, including philanthropy. Students and their families, as well as some governments, are resisting further increases in tuition and fees.
Canadian schools are being shaped by many forces as competition for the people and resources to address those forces is rising. Yet, these challenges are accompanied by opportunities to harness the benefits – financial, academic, and social – of internationalization.

 

This panel will discuss how university and independent school leaders are shaping the future of education by broadening their horizons beyond borders and previous models of success.

 

 

Go Fund Yourself!

Panelists:

  • Robert Moyles, Senior Director, Advancement Strategic Communications, University of Alberta
  • Kylie Patrick, Annual Giving Office, Carleton University
  • Dr. Nick Dragojlovic, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, University of British Columbia

Moderator: Ryan Davies, Director, Advancement Communications, Carleton University

 

Crowdfunding is not only an opportunity to find new donors – it’s a way to engage your campus community and expand your advancement efforts. In this interactive session, learn how faculty, students, and researchers can become active fundraisers for the university. Both Carleton University and the University of Alberta are engaged in crowdfunding from two different angles: Carleton built its own platform while UAlberta is working with USEED, an external group. This session will explore lessons learned and future opportunities for crowdfunding within post-secondary institutions in Canada.

 

 

Digital Alumni Engagement

Panelists:

  • Mark Savenkoff, Director, Alumni and Donor Relations, Carleton University
  • Jennifer Chesney, Associate Vice-President, University Digital Strategy, University of Alberta
  • Bob Sanders, VP, Solution Engineering, iModules Software
  • Sean Price - Associate Vice-President,  Alumni, University of Alberta (moderator

Universities reach a plateau when it comes to the number of events they can host and their respective appeal to alumni. So, how can we connect with a growing number of alumni in mutually meaningful ways? New technology offers more frequent and affordable opportunities—and creates a new model of engagement.

 

Learn how Carleton plans to use online research panels to start meaningful conversations with its graduates, how the University of Alberta engaged alumni through their groundbreaking Dino 101 Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) and how iModules, an industry leader, is transforming how educational institutions create relevant alumni experiences.

 

 

Professional Development Sessions #4

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

 

Morning at the Improv: The Art of Asking

Lorna Somers, Director of Development, Vice-President, McMaster University Foundation, McMaster University

 

The Art of Acting offers many valuable lessons to those of us required to master and excel at The Art of Asking. Improvisation is a powerful communication tool that’s applicable in much of our working lives and in our unique institutional cultures.

 

We are expected to be good at forging relationships, building trust, understanding timing, and telling a meaningful story. It’s a tall order indeed, and one that requires confidence, creativity, intelligence, and strategy. And then there is the actual asking; successfully extending the invitation to give.

 

Tips and techniques from one field will help inform our ability to excel at the other, especially when we identify the roadblocks and enable our creativity to flourish.

 

 

 

Too Many Cooks, Not Enough Chefs! Business Process Improvement

James Johannesson, Director of Advancement Services, University of Saskatchewan

 

The next five years will bring an increasingly competitive advancement environment in which many advancement shops are told to “do more with less”. This session is designed to provide a few cooking lessons for chefs dealing with Advancement’s complex business processes.

 

This session will:
Improve your understanding of how to build effective and efficient business processes using process modeling, process improvement, process metrics, and lean methodologies.

 

 

New Age of Phonathons: How to Treat Alumni Like Major Donors through Phone Calls

Mikhael Bornstein, Director Donor Programs, York University
Mariya Yurukova, Manager, Call Centre, York University

 

As donors are looking to engage on a deeper level, the phonathon is experiencing a renaissance. By repositioning a phonathon program to serve the purposes of alumni relations, advancement research, and development, you will learn how to build stronger relationships with donors, identify major and planned-giving prospects, and grow the lifetime value of your donor pool.
In this session you will learn:

  • How to reposition your phonathon program to serve the purposes of alumni relations and advancement research as well as development.
  • Scripting strategies to generate leads for major gifts and planned giving.
  • Strategies to craft value-added scripts and event promotion.
  • Staffing and training tips for hiring junior development officers rather than “student callers”.
  • Strategies for increasing “lifetime value”.

 

 

50 Events in 50 Days: A Summer Send-Off Program

Joella Gencher, Alumni Relations Officer, McGill University
Shana Szikman, Alumni Relations Officer, Parents Program, McGill University

 

By mid-August, when we have completed our 50-odd McGill Send-Off events – run collaboratively by the Regional Programs Office and the Parents Program – we sit back and ask ourselves: How did we do it?!

 

This presentation will outline the steps behind producing a large-scale program of largely volunteer-run, university-supported events for new students and their families. The bottom line is: With strong organization, a streamlined approach, and collaborative work, we execute successful events and achieve our goals.

 

This session will provide tips on:

  • How to foster relationships with volunteers to develop future alumni leaders, and how to best manage and prep the volunteers.
  • How to establish the Alumni Association's presence among your school’s families, even before a student begins their degree.
  • How the Send-Off program aids McGill to identify prospects.
  • How to run wide-scale, international alumni programming.
  • How to provide engagement opportunities for current students, young alumni, and parents.

 

 

The Outsiders No Longer: Embracing Non-Traditional Candidates to Grow Your Development Team

Christoph Clodius, Senior Consultant, Recruitment & Talent Management
Carmen Charette, Vice-President, External Relations, University of Victoria
Colm Renehan, Associate Vice-President, Development, University of Alberta

 

As the need for increased or sustained revenue grows, the role of the advancement professional shifts in complexity. What was once a relatively straightforward operations climate now demands expertise in such diverse areas as data management and analytics, marketing, e-commerce, and social media. The need for excellent fundraising staff with wide-ranging expertise has hit critical mass.

 

Finding the right person for the right role can be tough. Increasingly, education institutions are turning to people from outside the nonprofit sector to fill these roles, and a common challenge is the transferability of skills from other sectors. Candidates for highly specialized or technical areas prove difficult to assess without knowledge of the area in question.

Presenters in this interactive session will share strategies to recruit and assess talent from outside the sector, as well as how to define your needs in traditional non-fundraising roles.

This session will answer questions including:

  • Where do you look for specialized skills and talents?
  • How do you assess these attributes?
  • How do you keep staff engaged and happy?